Grab the banner below and add it your church website or ministry to help take action.

Plant Your Roots In Israel Donate Now

A new opportunity to bless the Holy Land. The central goal is to plant one million trees in Israel to help revitalize the land…
 

 


 

For I will take you out of the nations: I will gather you from all the countries and bring you back into your own land. Ezekiel 36:24 (NIV) Donate


 


 

The Israel Project (TIP) is an international non-profit organization devoted to educating the press and the public about Israel while promoting security, freedom and peace. The Israel Project provides journalists, leaders and opinion-makers accurate information about Israel. The Israel Project is not related to any government or government agency.

TIP Logo                                             
 

Contact:
Jennifer Laszlo Mizrahi: 202-857-6644, jenniferm@theisraelproject.org
Jennifer Packer: 202-857-6657, jenniferp@theisraelproject.org
www.theisraelproject.org

 

 

The Threat of Iranian Missile Development and Export
 
Iran’s rapidly expanding missile program is a growing threat to regional stability in the Middle East and is a cause of grave concern to Tehran’s immediate and more distant neighbors. Al-Alam , Iran ’s Arabic-language news service, recently declared that the Islamic Republic is the region’s missile power. [1]
On July 9, 2008, as part of a series of war games code-named “The Great Prophet,” Iran successfully launched the Shahab-3 missile that travels up to 930 miles (1,500 km). [2] The newer Shahab-3ER, with a 2,000-km range, puts Turkey into Iran ’s missile range. [3] Iran could also strike numerous European countries with its long-range ballistic BM25 land-mobile missiles; one model has a range of 1,550 miles (2,500 km) and the other can reach as far as 2,175 miles (3,500 km). [4]
In addition, Iran is also developing its own satellite-launching capability, which could allow for the conversion of a satellite launcher into an intercontinental ballistic missile with a range of almost 2,500 miles (4,000 km). [5]
Iran’s increasing military prowess indicates Tehran ’s growing ambitions in the international arena and its desire to exert even greater influence in Middle East affairs. In conjunction with Iran ’s continued support of terror through non-state organizations such as Hamas and Hezbollah , Iran is now in a position to spread its weapons technology to many other groups and regimes. Of particular concern is Tehran ’s ongoing uranium enrichment program, which has the potential of sparking a nuclear arms race in the Middle East .
At a recent military parade in Tehran , banners adorning six Shahab-3 missiles proudly displayed Iran ’s hatred toward Israel and the United States , reading, “Israel must be wiped off the map” and “We will crush America under our feet.” [6] 
 
 
 Iran's Missile Stock: Short-Range Missiles [7] 
 
Name Missile Stages Propulsion Range in miles (km) Inventory
Shahab-1

1

 
Liquid 177 - 205 (285-330) 250 - 300
Shahab-2

1

 
Liquid 310 - 435 (500-700) 200 – 450
Samid

1

 
Liquid -- --
Shahab-3
Zelzal-3

1

Liquid, solid 620-930 (1,000 -1,500) --
Shahab-3D
Zelzal-3D

2

Liquid, solid 930 (1,500 +) --
IRIS
Zelzal-3D

2

Liquid, solid 930 (1,500 +) --
Shahab-4

3

Liquid, solid 1,120-1,240 (1,800-2,000) --
IRSL-X-2

3

Liquid, solid 1,370-1,800 (2.200-2.900) --
Shahab-5
IRSL-X-3/Kosar
IRIS

2,3

Liquid, solid
Two stage: 2,170-2,330 (3,500-3,750)
Three stage: 2,485-2,670 (4,000-4,300)
--
Shahab-6
IRSL-X-4/Kosar

3

Liquid, solid 3,400-3,420 (5,470 -5,500)
3,500-3,850 (5,632 -6,200)
3,850-4,160 (6,200-6,700)
4,970+ (8,000+)
--
 
 
Ilustration: Federation of American Scientists
 
 
GBU-67/9A Qadr (“Destiny” in Arabic)
Missile-production companies working for the Iranian Ministry of Defense are manufacturing the GBU-67/9A Qadr, the first generation of precision-guided munitions (PGMs). [8]
Iranian Minister of Defense Brig. Gen.Mostafa Mohammad-Najjar announced in November 2007 that Tehran is developing the Qadr and another missile, the “Ashoura,” both with the capacity to travel beyond 1,242 miles (2,000 kilometers). [9]
 

Shahab

The Shahab (“Comet” in Farsi) is an Iranian missile based on the design of the Soviet R11, a 1950s Scud missile. [10] Iran originally acquired a small quantity of Scud missiles from Libya to retaliate against Iraqi attacks during the Iran-Iraq war. [11] Following the war, Iran acquired the 661-lb. (300-kg) Scud B and 1,278-lb. (580-kg) Scud C missiles from North Korea . The missiles were dubbed the Shahab-1 and Shahab-2, respectively. Many Shahab-1 missiles were fired into the encampments of the Mujahedeen el-Khalq (MEK) opposition group in Iraq . [12]
The acquisition of the Shahab-3 missile made Iran a threat to the Western world. The Shahab-1 and 2 had a limited range and primarily threatened Iraq . The Shahab-3, tested in 1998, had a range of 806 miles (1,300 km), placing Tel Aviv under threat. The Shahab-3 and the Pakistani “Ghauri” are similar to the North Korean Scud missile, the No Dong. In 2004, Iran revealed the more powerful and precise Shahab-3. The latest version of the missile, with a range of up to 930 miles (1,500 km), is longer with a modified external design. [13] Between 1998 and 2006, 10 test flights of the Shahab-3 were carried out, half of which failed. [14] 
Israel and the U.S. have prepared for a Shahab-3 attack by having the crew of the American Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean Sea practice intercepting missiles aimed at them. [15] On July 9, 2008, Iran test-fired a Shahab-3 missile with a range of 1,242 miles (2,000 kilometers). [16]
In 2005, Iran announced that it had succeeded in testing solid propellant motors for a “twin engine” missile for the latest model of Shahab. [17] According to the journal Strategic Assessment, Iran has developed the longer-range Shahab-4, Shahab-5 (Kosar), and Shahab-6. [18] 
Military experts consider the Shahab-4 the Iranian counterpart to the North Korean Taepodong-1. [19] These missiles cause heavier damage than the Shahab-3, carrying a greater payload and with and increased range of up to 2,480 miles (4,000 kilometers). [20] The missile would have the capability of thrusting an Iranian satellite up to 22 miles (35 kilometers) into space from the launching pad near the city of Qom . [21]
 
 
BM-25
The BM-25 Ballistic Missile is Iran ’s newest long-range acquisition. Obtained from North Korea , it has a range of 1,550-2,170 miles (2,500-3,500 km) using the new technology of storable liquid propulsion. [22] According to the German newspaper Bild, Iran purchased 18 BM-25 missiles and launchers from North Korea . The BM-25 is based on the Soviet SS-N-6 (R-27) submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM). [23] Iranian officials and the Russian minister of defense denied the report. [24]
 
 
 

Iranian Rocket Stock 
Iran possesses a wide range of artillery rockets systems: the Shahin, Oghab, Fajar (also fadjr, fajr), Naze'at, and Zelzal missiles. Iran used Oghab missiles during the February-April 1988 “War of the Cities” to shell Iraqi cities and towns. [25]
The Haseb, an Iranian 12-tube, four-inch (107 mm) multiple rocket launcher, is a modification of a Chinese 4-inch (107 mm) rocket, as well as an upgrade of Chinese and Russian five-inch (122 mm) rockets. [26] The Nazeat-10, an extended-range mode of the Nazeat-6, is blasted from the same launcher as the Oghab. [27]
Oghab is an unguided high explosive rocket. A nine-inch (230-mm) artillery rocket with a range of 21 miles (34 kilometers), the Oghab launches with three launch tubes. [28]
The Shahin I and the Shahin II are both high-explosive rockets. [29] The Shahin II is an unguided rocket designed to destroy enemy troops. [30]
In 1991, Iran introduced the Fajar missile with the aid of North Korea . [31] A drawback with the Fajar missile is that it has limited accuracy within a radius of less than half a mile (1 km). [32]
Iran has tested a chemical warhead for the Fajar-5, which included an enhanced launcher with four 13-inch (333 mm) caliber launch tubes. [33] The primary mission of the Fajar-5 launching system is to hit ground targets. [34]
Iranian representatives dubbed the Fateh-110 or the A-110 as a solid fuel power guided missile. [35] It is probably an upgraded guided model of the Zelzal-2 with a range of between 99 to 124 miles (160 to 200 km). [36] Several military experts claim that the Fateh-110 is not a missile because it lacks an effective guidance system. [37] 
 

Iranian Artillery Rockets [38]
 

 
   
Rocket Range in miles(km) Warhead weight in pounds (kg)    
Haseb

5.5 (9 km)

18 (8 kg)

   
Noor

11 (18 km)

40 (18 kg)

   
Arash

12.5 (20 km)

40 (18 kg)

   
Arash

12.5 (20 km)

18 (8 kg)

   
Oghab

21-28 (34 - 45 km)

154 (70 kg)

   
Fajr-3 / Ra'ad

28 (45 km)

99 (45 kg)

   
Shahin-1

8 (13 km)

418 (190 kg)

   
Shahin-2

20 (12 km)

190 (86 kg)

   
Fajr-5

75 (47 km)

90 (41 kg)

   
Naze'at-4

90 (56 km)

--

   
Naze'at-5

--

--

   
Naze'at-6

105 (65 km)

85 (39 kg)

   
Naze'at-10

140 (87 km)

250 (113 kg)

   
Mushak-120

130 (81 km)

500 (227 kg)

   
Zelzal-2

100-200 (62 - 124 km)

--

   
 
 
 
Cruise Missiles
In 2005, Ukraine ’s prosecutor-general announced that arms dealers had smuggled several KH55 Soviet-era cruise missiles into Iran between 1991 - 2001. [39] The missiles have a range of 2,100 miles (3,500 km). [40]  
Terrorist Groups Aided by Iran
Iran remains the world’s most active state supporter of terrorism, providing funding, weapons and training to Hezbollah and Palestinian groups such as Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad; the latter two have mounted violent opposition against the Palestinian Authority president’s Fatah group. [41]
Hamas
In light of the proposed peace talks between Syria and Israel , an Iranian official announced that Iran would continue to fund Hamas even if peace were reached. A ranking military officer promised the government that “very advanced” missiles were under development especially for Hamas. [42]
 
 Hezbollah
Iran provided the terrorist group Hezbollah thousands of rockets that Hezbollah used in its war against Israel in 2006. Hezbollah currently has 30,000 rockets, according to the United Nations. [43]
Hezbollah possesses Zelzal-1 rockets, with a 78-mile (125-km) range, and Zelzal-2 rockets, with a 130-mile (210-km) range, which are capable of hitting the Israeli cities of Tel Aviv, along the Mediterranean Sea , and Be’er Sheba in the south. These long-range missiles were smuggled into Lebanon two to three years prior to Israel ’s defensive war against Hezbollah (also known as the Second Lebanon War) and stored in the Beirut area. [44]
 
 
 
They were probably not used during the war. Hezbollah used the Iranian-produced Falaq to attack equipped targets. The Falaq-1 rocket has a range of up to 5.5 miles (nine km) while the Falaq-2 has a maximum distance of seven miles (11 km). [45]
The Iranian-constructed rockets Fajar-3 and Fajar-5, with ranges of up to 43 miles (70 km), were also supplied to Hezbollah militants. Iranian engineers designed rooms in the homes of Hezbollah activists to install rocket launchers and to store weapons. [46] Fajar rockets became the main threat to the northern region of Israel during the 2006 war.
The Iranian-made Naze’at rockets have a range of up to 86 miles (140 km). They were not used during Hezbollah’s 2006 war against Israel . 
Iran supplied Hezbollah with Chinese-made C-802 land-to-sea cruise missiles. The C-802 was used to hit an Israeli naval ship off the coast of Beirut on July 14, 2006. [47]
Future of Iran ’s Missiles
U.S. pressure on China has prevented Iran from acquiring the M-9 and M-11 single-stage, solid-fuel, road-mobile missiles. Iran is also relying on China to continue the development of the 1,100-pound (500 kg) Tondar-68 with a range of 620 miles and the Iran-700 with a range of 434 miles (700 km) of the same weight. [48] Jane’s Defence Weekly reports that China may be aiding Iran in improving the range of HY-1 (HaiYing-1) [49]  and HY-2 (HaiYing-2) [50] land-to-ship missiles, [51] which could put the Persian Gulf at risk.
 
 
 
 
________________________________________
Footnotes:
 
[1] “Iran test-fires long range missile,” Islamic Republic News Agency, July 9, 2008, 
 http://www2.irna.ir/en/news/view/line-17/0807093136122440.htm 
[2] “IRGC commander: Armed forces in full combat readiness,” Islamic Republic News Agency, July 10, 2008, 
 http://www2.irna.ir/en/news/view/line-22/0807104917193005.htm 
[3] Rubin, Uzi, “The Global Range of Iran’s Ballistic Missile Program,” Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, June 20, 2006, Vol. 5, No. 26, retrieved on Sept. 12, 2008 from 
http://jcpa.org/JCPA/Templates/ShowPage.asp?DBID=1&LNGID=1&TMID=111&FID=254&PID=0&IID=494
[4] Ibid.
[5] “Report: Iran almost ready to launch spy satellite into space,” Haaretz, Jan. 26, 2007, 
 http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/818236.html 
[6] “Iranian Artillery Rockets,” GlobalSecurity.org, Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/iran/mrl-iran.htm
[7] “Iran Missiles” Federation of American Scientists. Retrieved July 13, 2008 from 
 http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/iran/missile/ 
[8] “Weapons of Mass Destruction,” GlobalSecurity.org, Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
 http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/iran/missile-overview.htm 
[9] “Defense Minister: Iran developing 2,000-km-range missile,” Islamic Republic News Agency, Nov. 27, 2007, 
 http://www2.irna.ir/en/news/view/line-17/0711272813150829.htm 
[10] Rubin, Uzi, “The Global Reach of Iran’s Ballistic Missiles,” Tel Aviv University Press, Ramat Aviv, 2006, pg. 17
[11] Ibid.
[12] Shapir, Yitzhak S., “Iran’s Strategic Missiles,” Strategic Assessment, Volume 9, No. 1, April 2006,
[13] Ibid.
[14] Rubin, Uzi, “The Global Reach of Iran’s Ballistic Missiles,” Tel Aviv University Press, Ramat Aviv, 2006, pg. 22
[15] Oren, Amir, “ U.S. admiral: Iran strike on Israel ‘likely’,” Haaretz, Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
http://www.haaretz.com/hasen/spages/998839.html
[16] Iran test new long-range missile,” BBC News, July 9, 2008, 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7496765.stm
[17] Shapir, Yitzhak S., “Iran’s Strategic Missiles,” Strategic Assessment, Volume 9, No. 1, April 2006, 
http://www.tau.ac.il/jcss/sa/v9n1p8Shapir.html
[18] Ibid.
[19] Ibid.
[20] Ibid.
[21] Ibid.
[22] Rubin, Uzi, “The Global Reach of Iran’s Ballistic Missiles,” Tel Aviv University Press, Ramat Aviv, 2006, pg. 30
[23] “Ya-zahra Project Low-altitude Surface-to-Air Missile System (Iran), Self-propelled surface-to-air missiles,” Jane's Land-Based Air Defense, May 27, 2008. Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
http://www.janes.com/extracts/extract/jlad/jlad0588.html
[24] Ibid.
[25] Iranian Artillery Rockets,” GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/iran/mrl-iran.htm
[26] Iranian Artillery Rockets,” GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/iran/mrl-iran.htm
[27] Ibid.
[28] Ibid.
[29] Ibid.
[30] Ibid.
[31] Ibid.
[32] Ibid.
[33] Ibid.
[34] Ibid.
[35] Shapir, Yitzhak S., “Iran’s Strategic Missiles,” Strategic Assessment, Volume 9, No. 1, April 2006, 
http://www.tau.ac.il/jcss/sa/v9n1p8Shapir.html
[36] Ibid.
[37] Ibid.
[38] Shapir, Yitzhak S., “Iran’s Strategic Missiles,” Strategic Assessment, Volume 9, No. 1, April 2006,
http://www.tau.ac.il/jcss/sa/v9n1p8Shapir.html
[39] “Cruise Missile row rocks Ukraine,” BBC News, March 18, 2005, 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/4361505.stm
[40] “Iran’s race for Regional Supremacy,” Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs, 2008
[41] “Iran: Proxy Groups,” Globalsecurity.org. Retrieved July 13, 2008 from 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/intell/world/iran/proxy-groups.htm
[42] “Iran Pledges to Continue Support of Hamas,” Asharq Al-Awsat, May 26, 2008, 
http://www.asharq-e.com/news.asp?section=1&id=12877
[43] Associated Press, “UN report: Israel says Hezbollah's arsenal includes 30,000 rockets,” International Herald Tribune, March 4, 2008, 
http://www.iht.com/articles/ap/2008/03/04/news/UN-GEN-UN-Lebanon-Israel.php
[44] Harel, Amos, and Issacharoff, Avi, 34 Days: Israel, Hezbollah, and the War in Lebanon. London: MacMillan Press, London, 2008, p. 49
[45] Hezbollah as a strategic arm of Iran," Intelligence and Terrorism Information Center at the Center for Special Studies, Sept. 8, 2006, 
http://www.terrorism-info.org.il/malam_multimedia/English/eng_n/html/iran_hezbollah_e1b.htm
[46] Hersh, Seymour M, “Watching Lebanon: Washington’s interests in Israel’s war,” New Yorker, Aug. 21, 2006, 
 http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2006/08/21/060821fa_fact 
[47] Ibid.
[48] “Iranian Artillery Rockets,” GlobalSecurity.org, Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from 
http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/iran/missile-overview.htm
[49] “HY-1 Anti-Ship Missile,” sinodefence.com, April 23, 2006. Retrieved Sept. 8, 2008 from 
http://www.sinodefence.com/navy/navalmissile/hy1.asp
[50] “HY-2 Anti-Ship Missile,” sinodefence.com, April 23, 2006. Retrieved Sept. 8, 2008 from 
http://www.sinodefence.com/navy/navalmissile/hy2.asp
[51] "Iranian Artillery Rockets,” GlobalSecurity.org, Retrieved on July 7, 2008 from
http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/iran/missile-overview.htm

 

The Israel Project is an international non-profit, nonpartisan organization devoted to educating the press and the public about Israel while promoting security, freedom and peace. The Israel Project provides journalists, leaders and opinion-makers accurate information about Israel . The Israel Project is not related to any government or government agency and does not rate or endorse candidates. 

Board of Advisors: Sen. Evan Bayh (IN), Sen. Ben Cardin (MD), Sen. Saxby Chambliss (GA), Sen. Tom Coburn (OK), Sen. Norm Coleman (MN), Sen. Susan Collins (ME), Sen. Judd Gregg (NH), Sen. Joe Lieberman (CT), Sen. Ben Nelson (NE), Sen. Gordon Smith (OR), Sen. Arlen Specter (PA), Sen. Ron Wyden (OR), Rep. Rob Andrews (NJ), Rep. Shelley Berkley (NV), Rep. Tom Davis (VA), Rep. Eliot Engel (NY), Rep. Frank Pallone (NJ), Rep. Jon Porter (NV), Rep. John Sarbanes (MD), Rep. Jim Saxton (NJ), Rep. Brad Sherman (CA), Rep. Joe Wilson (SC), Actor and Director Ron Silver